The Extraordinary Gardener - Year 1 Book Inspired Learning

As soon as I saw this book, my mind was buzzing with the wonderful art it could inspire. Then I started reading and realised that it goes way beyond art. As you will see from my Year 1 book inspired learning resource below, it is rich in inspirational opportunities for learning in most subjects.  This resource is for Year 1 children, for an Early Years version, sign up for our Bookish Bulletin.  

Extraordinary Gardener book inspired learning

Philosophy for Children Enquiry Based on 'Sweep'

The picture book 'Sweep' centres around Ed, a boy trying to deal with overwhelming emotions.  In particular, a bad mood.  But what is a bad mood? What is it to children?  These questions ran through my mind as I was reading it and I knew then that this book provides the perfect stimulus for philosophy for children.  The P4C plan below is aimed at Reception aged children.  For more exclusive book inspired learning resources, sign up below for our bookish bulletin.

Ideas adapted from 'The Philosophy Man', Jason Buckley.

Ideas adapted from 'The Philosophy Man', Jason Buckley.

Book Inspired Learning Ideas for Brick: Who Found Herself in Architecture

Throughout my teaching career I always put high quality literature at the heart of children's learning.  Whole topics and learning themes were inspired by books and so were the children.  It gives a purpose for, and more value to, learning when everything is linked.  But developing a book led creative curriculum takes time, something busy teachers have precious little of.  So here is my little bit to help, learning maps inspired by some of the beautiful bookish treasures we have here at Pages of Joy.  Perfect for homeschooling too! For more exclusive content not published here, sign up here for our Bookish Bulletin.  

Learning map for Brick: Who Found Herself in Architecture.  This resource is recommended for Years 1 and 2. 

Deeper Reading Questions for: Brick: Who Found Herself in Architecture

There is reading and there is reading. Armed with good word recognition, children can read, but if their skills in language comprehension aren't as sound, understanding of what is being read will be limited.  And there is comprehension and there is comprehension.  Possessing an understanding of events at a literal level is quite different to being able to comprehend at a deeper level.  We want to develop thinking readers who use language to make inferences and predictions, who 'picture' what they are reading, who make links and use reasoning skills.  This needs teaching.  Nurture of these skills comes through questioning.  A careful mix of open, higher order questions and some more precise.  To help busy teachers and parents, I will be posting example questions that can be used to develop children's comprehension of some of the high quality texts we have here at Pages of Joy.  For more exclusive content not published here, sign up to our Book Bulletin. 

Deeper reading questions for Brick: Who Found Herself in Architecture.  This resource is recommended for children aged 5 - 7.